Orthodoxy & Memorial service

Memorial service Mp4
•  Greek μνημόσυνον “memorial“:
ΕΙΣ ΜΝΗΜΟΣΥΝΟΝ ΑΙΩΝΙΟΝ ΗΧΟΣ Α Δ ΠΑΙΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΣ
• Slavonic: панихида, panikhída, from Greek παννυχίς, pannychis, “vigil“:
Panakhida Memorial Saturday Services Вечная память Vechnaya Pamyat
• Romanian: parastas, from Greek παραστάς, parastas
[Traditional folk funeral ritual [Transylvania, Sibiu county 1937]:
Cocosdaiul _ Funeral ritual
is a liturgical solemn service for the repose of departed
in the Orthodox Church.

Burial is a time-honoured and ancient Christian custom.
The modern multi-billion death industry is a historical novelty.
Today the usual burial involves practices with the deceased that are not traditionally Christian.
The loving care of the departed is an act of real Love.
As the Body of the Lord Jesus was cared for
by Saints Joseph and Nicodemos and the Myrrhbearing women,
washed, anointed, clothed and placed with prayer into a tomb,
so Orthodox Christians have traditionally buried their loved ones.
After Burial the Orthodox Church has her own Tradition:

Saturday is generally
a day dedicated to prayer for the departed,
because Christ, our Lord,
lay dead in the Tomb on a Saturday.
In some monasteries and large churches,
it is customary to serve a Panikhida on every Saturday.

The various prayers for the departed
have as their purpose to pray for the repose of the departed,
to comfort the living and to remind those who remain of their own mortality.
For this reason, memorial services have an air of penitence about them.

The Church’s prayers for the dead begin at the moment of death,
when the priest leads the Prayers at the Departure of the Soul,
consisting of a special Canon and prayers for the release of the soul. Then the body is washed, clothed and laid in the coffin,
after which the priest begins the First Panikhida [prayer service for the departed].
After the First Panikhida, the family and friends
begin reading the Psalter aloud beside the casket.
This reading continues until the funeral begins
[usually on the third day after death],
being interrupted only by more Panikhidas
[at least one per day].

Orthodox Christians offer particularly
fervent prayers for the departed
on the first 40 days after death.
Traditionally, in addition to the service on the day of death,
the memorial service is performed at the request of the relatives
of an individual departed person on the following occasions:
– 3rd day after death
– 9th day
– 40th day
– 1rst anniversary of death
– 3rd anniversary (some will request a memorial every year on the anniversary of death)

In addition to Panikhidas for individuals,
there are also several days during the year
that are set aside as special general commemorations of the dead,
when all departed Orthodox Christians will be prayed for together
[this is especially to benefit those who have no one on earth to pray for them].
The majority of these general commemorations
fall on the various “Soul Saturdays” throughout the year [mostly during Great Lent].
On these days, in addition to the normal Panikhida,
there are special additions to Vespers and Matins,
and there will be proper’s for the departed added to the Divine Liturgy.
These days of general memorial are:

Meatfare Saturday [two Saturdays before Great Lent begins]
– in some traditions families and friends will offer Panikhidas
for their loved ones during the week,
culminating in the general commemoration on Saturday
– The second Saturday of Great Lent
– The third Saturday of Great Lent
– The fourth Saturday of Great Lent
– Radonitsa [the second Tuesday after Easter]
– The Saturday before Pentecost
– in some traditions families and friends will offer Panikhidas
for their loved ones during the week,
culminating in the general commemoration on Saturday

Demetrius Saturday
[the Saturday before the feast of Saint Demetrius, Oct. 26th].
In the Bulgarian Orthodox Church
there is a commemoration of the dead
on the Saturday before the feast of Saint Michael,
the Archangel, Nov. 8th,
instead of the Demetrius Soul Saturday.

The most important form of prayer for the dead
occurs in the Divine Liturgy.
Particles are cut from the prosphoron during the Proskomedie at the beginning of the Liturgy.
These particles are placed beneath the Lamb [Host] on the diskos, where they remain throughout Holy Liturgy.
After the Communion of the faithful,
the deacon brushes these particles into the chalice, saying,
“Wash away, O Lord,
the sins of all those here commemorated,
by Thy Precious Blood,
through the prayers of all thy saints”.
Of this action, Saint Mark of Ephesus says,
We can do nothing better or greater for the dead than to pray for them,
offering commemoration for them at Holy Liturgy.
Of this they are always in need . . . . .
The body feels nothing then:
it does not see its close ones who have assembled,
does not smell the fragrance of the flowers,
does not hear the funeral orations.
But the soul senses the prayers offered for it
and is grateful to those who make them
and is spiritually close to them
“.

Normally, candidates for sainthood,
prior to their Glorification [Canonization] as a Saint,
will be commemorated by serving Panikhidas.
Then, on the eve of their Glorification
will be served an especially solemn Requiem,
known as the “Last Panikhida“.

• Saint Basil the Great [† 379], a saint of undivided Christianity, writes in his Third Kneeling Prayer at Pentecost:
O Christ our God . . .
[Who] on this all-perfect and saving Feast,
art graciously pleased to accept propitiatory prayers
for those who are imprisoned in hades,
promising unto us who are held in bondage great hope of release
from the vileness that does hinder us and did hinder them . . . . .
send down Your consolation . . . . .
and establish their souls in the mansions of the Just;
and graciously vouchsafe unto them Peace and pardon;
for not the dead shall praise You, O Lord,
neither shall they who are in Hell make bold
to offer unto thee confession.
But we who are living will bless You,
and will pray, and offer unto You
propitiatory prayers and sacrifices for their souls
“.

• Saint Gregory Dialogos [† 604]
in his famous Dialogues [written in 593] teaches that,
“The Holy Sacrifice [Eucharist] of Christ, our saving Victim,
brings great benefits to souls even after death,
provided their sins [are such as] can be pardoned in the life to come”.
However, Saint. Gregory goes on to say,
the Church’s practice of prayer for the dead
must not be an excuse for not living a godly life on earth.
“The safer course, naturally,
is to do for ourselves during life
what we hope others will do for us after death”.

• Father Seraphim Rose [† 1982] says,
The Church’s prayer cannot save anyone
who does not wish salvation,
or who never offered any struggle [podvig]
for it himself during his lifetime
“.

Remember, O Lord, the God of Spirits and of all Flesh,
those whom we have remembered
and those whom we have not remembered,
men of the “True Faith, from Righteous Abel unto to-day;
do You Yourself give them rest there in the land of the living,
in Your Kingdom, in the delight of Paradise,
in the bosom of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, our Holy fathers,
from whence pain and sorrow and sighing have fled away,
where the Light of Your countenance visited them
and always shines upon them
“.
Prayer for the departed – Liturgy of Saint James

3rd Sunday of Lent – Veneration of our own Cross

And when He had called the people unto Him with His disciples also,
He said unto them, ’Whosoever will come after Me,
let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.
For whosoever will save his life shall lose it;
but whosoever shall lose his life for My sake and the Gospel’s,
the same shall save it.
For what shall it profit a man,
if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?
Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?
Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of Me
and of My words in this adulterous and sinful generation;
of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed,
when He comes in the Glory of His Father
with the holy angels’
.
And He said unto them,
’Verily I say unto you,
that there be some of them that stand here,
which shall not taste of death,
till they have seen the Kingdom of God
come with power’
“.
Marc.8: 34- 9: 1

For what will it profit a man
if he gains the whole world and forfeits his soul?
Or what will a man give in exchange for his soul?
For the Son of Man is going
to come in the Glory of His Father with His angels
and will then repay every man
according to his deeds
“.
Matth.16: 27

Jesus answered,
’If I want him to remain alive
until I return, what is that to you?
You must follow me’
Because of this,
the rumour spread among the believers
that this disciple would not die.
But Jesus did not say that he would not die;
he only said,
’If I want him to remain alive until I return,
what is that to you’?
“.
John 21: 22,23

’Men of Galilee’ they said,
’why do you stand here looking into the sky?
This same Jesus,
Who has been taken from you into Heaven,
will come back in the same way
you have seen Him go into Heaven’
Acts 1: 11

For the son of man, the True Disciple of Christ
shall come in the Glory of his Father . . . . .

A True Disciple of Christ is one
that does follow Him in duty,
and shall follow Him to Glory.
He is one that walks in the same way Christ walked in,
is led by His Spirit, and treads in His steps, where ever he goes.
Let him deny himself.
If ’self-denial’ be a hard lesson,
it is no more than what our Master learned and practised,
to redeem us, and to teach us.
Let him take up his cross.
The cross is here put
for every trouble that befalls us.
We are apposite to think
we could bear another’s cross
better than our own;
but that is best which is appointed us
and we ought to make the best of it.
We must not by our rashness and folly pull
crosses down upon our own heads,
but must take them up
when they are in our way.
If any man will have the name and credit of a Disciple,
let him follow Christ in the work and duty of a Disciple.
If all worldly things are worthless
when compared with the life of the body,
how forcible the same argument with respect
to the soul and its state of
never-ending happiness or misery!
Thousands lose their souls for the most trifling gain,
or the most worthless indulgence,
nay, often from mere sloth and negligence.
Whatever is the object for which men forsake Christ,
that is the price at which Satan buys their souls.
Yet one soul is worth more than all the world.
This is Christ’s Judgment upon the matter;
He knew the Price of souls, for He redeemed them;
nor would He underrate the world, for He made it.
The dying transgressor cannot purchase one hour’s respite
to seek Mercy for his perishing soul.
Let us then learn rightly to value our souls,
and Christ as the only Saviour of them.

And He said to me,
’Do not seal up
the words of the Prophecy of this Book,
for the time is near.
Let the one who does wrong, still do wrong;
and the one who is filthy [
dirty], still be filthy;
and let the one who is righteous,
still practice righteousness;
and the one who is holy,
still keep himself holy.
Behold, I am coming quickly
and My reward is with Me,
to render to every man
according to what he has done.
I am the Alpha and the Omega,
the first and the last,
the beginning and the end . . . . . ’
“.
Apocalypse 22: 11-13

Self-denial
Leonard Bernstein,
the celebrated orchestra conductor,
was asked,
what is the hardest instrument to play.
He replied without hesitation:
Second fiddle.
I can always get plenty of first violinists,
but to find one who plays second violin
with as much enthusiasm
or second French horn or second flute,
now that’s a problem.
And yet if no one plays second,
we have no harmony
“.

Self-denial is a summons to submit
to the authority of God as Father
and of Jesus as Lord
and to declare lifelong war
on one’s instinctive egoism.
What is to be negated is not personal self
or one’s existence as a rational and responsible human being.
Jesus does not plan to turn us into zombies,
nor does he ask us to volunteer for a robot role.
The required denial is of carnal self,
the egocentric, self-deifying urge with which we were born
and which dominates us
so ruinously in our natural state.
Jesus links self-denial with cross-bearing.
Cross-bearing is far more than enduring this or that hardship.
Carrying one’s cross in Jesus’ day,
as we learn from the story of Jesus’ own Crucifixion,
was required of those whom society had condemned,
whose rights were forfeit,
and who were now being
led out to their execution.
The cross they carried was the instrument of death.
Jesus represents discipleship as a matter of following Him,
and following Him as based on taking up one’s cross in self-negation.
Carnal self would never consent to cast us in such a role.
When Christ calls a man, He bids him come and die.
The cross is laid on every Christian.
It begins with the call to abandon
the attachments of this world.
It is that dying of the old man
which is the result of his encounter with Christ
“,
wrote Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
Bonhoeffer was right:
Accepting death to everything
that carnal self wants to possess
is what Christ’s summons
to self-denial was all about.

And the Word was made flesh,
and dwelt among us,
[and we beheld His Glory, the Glory as
of the only begotten of the Father],

full of Grace and Truth . . . . .
And of His Fulness have all we received,
and Grace for grace.
For the law was given by Moses,
but Grace and Truth
came by Jesus Christ“.
John 1: 14, 16-17

3rd Sunday – Veneration of the Cross – We have a Great High Priest

Seeing then that we have
a Great High Priest,
that is passed into the Heavens,
Jesus the Son of God,
let us hold fast our profession.
For we have not an High Priest which cannot be touched
with the feeling of our infirmities;
but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.
Let us therefore come boldly unto the Throne of Grace,
that we may obtain Mercy, and find Grace to help in time of need.
For every high priest taken from among men
is ordained for men in things pertaining to God,
that he may offer both gifts and sacrifices for sins:
Who can have compassion on the ignorant,
and on them that are out of the way;
for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity.
And by reason hereof he ought, as for the people,
so also for himself, to offer for sins.
And no man takes this honour unto himself,
but he that is called of God, as was Aäron.
So also Christ glorified not Himself to be made an High Priest;
but He that said unto Him,
You are My Son,
today have I begotten You.
As He said also in another place,
You are a Priest for ever
after the order of Melchisedec“.
Hebr.4: 14-5: 6

I will declare the decree:
The Lord has said to Me,
‘You are My Son,
Today I have begotten You
“.
Psalm 2: 7

The Lord has sworn
and will not relent,
’You are a priest forever
according to
the order of Melchizedek’
”.
Psalm 109: 4

The work and ministry of Jesus Christ in our behalf
The book of Hebrews was written
in order to help keep faithful
those who were tempted to fall away
from the faith.
What Christian, in what era,
hasn’t faced the same temptation?
Therefore the relevance of what Paul wrote to the Hebrews is for us, even today.
Hebrews points weary New Testament believers
– to Jesus,
– to His work on earth below and
– to His work in Heaven above.
The book reveals Jesus in various roles, each one helping us
understand the great Salvation that has been offered to the world through Him.
The Letter shows us a very heavy emphasis on the Old Testament,
on its history and on its sanctuary, and the book is written in a manner implying
that the Apostle knew the readers were known something about that history and sanctuary.

In looking at the richness and deepness
of Jesus in Hebrews, we must consider
the witness of both
the Old and the New Testaments,
which together form an indivisible unity
of the revelation from God,  a unity suggested by its main focus on one Saviour.
This letter is written by Paul because it seemed to be that these people were
in danger of falling away from Christianity and returning to Judaism.
They were losing faith in the Second Coming
[they thought Christ should have been back already];
and, as time progressed,
they were in danger of drifting away from the great Truths of the Gospel.
Thus, not only does Hebrews begin with Jesus as Creator,
it quickly moves to His role as our Saviour.
Instantly linked with His role as our Saviour is His role as our High Priest in Heaven,
a key element of the book of Hebrews.
This is seen in the final clause of
Hebrews 1: 3,  where, after talking about His purging our sins, it says:
that He sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high“.
The apostle faces that the new system is better than [superior to] the old,
because its Mediator is the Divine Son of God [Hebr.8: 6; 9: 15].
Jesus, who is human [Hebr.2: 5-18] and Divine [Hebr.1: 1-4],
is able to bring God and humans into a special Covenant association.

Jesus’ Human Nature
The letter to the Hebrews also sets forth the full Divinity and the full humanity of Jesus
in a special contrast:
But we see Jesus, Who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death,
crowned with Glory and Honour; that He by the Grace of God should taste
death for every man
“[Hebr.2: 9].
Jesus’ status as lower than the angels was in a limited manner.
A contrast is drawn between the nature of angels and that of the Son.
According to the laws of Hebrew parallelism,
the angels and the ministers must be related terms.
Angels are ministers, servants of God. Jesus, however, is Deity:
Your Throne, O God, is forever and ever;
a Sceptre of Righteousness is the Sceptre of Your Kingdom
“.
Psalm 44: 6
Jesus Christ took this position, because it was necessary for the plan of Salvation.
By becoming a human being, Jesus won for us the Victory
that could not have been possible had Jesus chosen
to remain eternally separated from humanity.
“Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the Heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession” and then “Let us therefore come boldly unto the Throne of Grace, that we may obtain Mercy, and find Grace to help in time of need.” (Hebr.4: 14,16).
In short here is said: Hang on to your Faith in Christ.
These words, of course, are so important for us today, as well.
Jesus died for us.
The Cross is the turning point of history and of our fate.
Jesus serves as our High Priest; He is intervening in Heaven in our behalf.
He is our great High Priest.
Therefore, we have confidence and assurance,
because Someone now stands in Heaven in our stead, Someone Who, in fact,
knows what it is to be tempted by sin [see Hebr. 4:15].
He knows how it feels to be human, to be tempted, to be hungry,
to be tired, to be assaulted, abandoned, and to face death,
because, as a human, He went through it all.

Therefore, we are called to draw close to God
and receive Mercy, Grace, and Help from Someone Who can relate to us.
The way to the Heavenly Sanctuary, the way to the Throne of God, the Kingdom is now open!
God is our Father, we are His children, and He treats us as such [Hebr.12: 7- 9].
Jesus’ Sacrifice is once-for-all and is sufficient for all.
We just have to accept it.
The book Hebrews may present the aim of the epistle:
Do not give up on Jesus! The best has come.
Jesus is the fulfilment of the Old Testament types
and the guarantee of Salvation.

The Incarnation [becoming man] of Christ has ever been,
and will ever remain a Mystery.
That which is revealed, is for us and for our children,
but let every human being be warned from the ground
of making Christ altogether human,
such an one as ourselves;
for it cannot be.

Orthodoxy & the Mystery of Knowledge

Man has always been fascinated by ultimate things
— life, death, the origin of the world —
and his discoveries in other fields of knowledge
have given him confidence to assume
that someday these mysteries
will also yield to the power of his intellect.
Such pride of mind, however,
can only lead away from the truth,
which, according to Orthodox teaching,
is the aim and foundation of all true knowledge.
How is such knowledge acquired?
Here we have part of a longer essay
by the renowned Serbian theologlan of blessed memory, Archimandrite Justin Popovich [†1979],
in which he distils the writings of Saint Isaac the Syrian
on the Orthodox theology of knowledge.

Briefly, he explains that because
man’s understanding became darkened through sin,
through consorting with evil,
he became incapable of True knowledge.
Man can come to this knowledge only
when his soul [the seat of understanding] is healed.
This is made possible by means of the virtues,
and the primary virtue in this remedial process is Faith.
Through faith, the mind,
which was previously dispersed among the passions,
is concentrated, freed from sensuality,
and endowed with peace and humility of thought ….
It is by the ascesis of faith that a man conquers egotism,
steps beyond the bounds of self, and enters into a new,
transcendent reality which also transcends subjectivity
“.

In separate sections, Father Justin discusses Prayer, Humility, Love and Grace, all requisite
companions of Faith,
before leading the reader into
“The Mystery of Knowledge”,
which we have reprinted below with slight abbreviations.

According to the teaching of Saint Isaac the Syrian,
there are two sorts of knowledge:
that which precedes Faith
and that which is born of faith.
The former is natural knowledge
and involves the discernment of good and evil.
The latter is spiritual knowledge and is
– “the perception of the mysteries“,
– “the perception of what is hidden“,
– “the contemplation of the invisible“.

There are also two sorts of faith:
the first comes through hearing and is confirmed
and proven by the second,
– “the faith of contemplation“,
– “the faith that is based on what has been seen“.
In order to acquire spiritual knowledge,
a man must first be freed from natural knowledge.
This is the work of Faith.
It is by the Ascesis of Faith that there comes to man
that “unknown power
that makes him capable of spiritual knowledge.
If a man allows himself to be caught in the web of natural knowledge,
it is more difficult for him to free himself from it
than to cast off iron bonds,
and his life is lived “against the edge of a sword“.

When a man begins to follow the path of Faith,
he must lay aside once and for all
his old methods of knowing,
for faith has its own methods.
Then natural knowledge ceases and spiritual knowledge takes its place.
Natural knowledge is contrary to faith,
for Faith, and all that comes from Faith, is
the destruction of the laws of knowledge
–> though not of spiritual,
but of natural knowledge.

The chief characteristic of natural knowledge
is its approach by examination and experimentation.
This is in itself “a sign of uncertainty about the truth“.
Faith, on the contrary, follows a pure and simple way of thought that is far removed
from all guile and methodical examination.
These two paths lead in opposite directions.
The house of faith is “childlike thoughts and simplicity of heart”, for it is said,
Glorify God in simplicity of heart” [cf. Col.3: 22],
and:
Except ye be converted and become as little children,
ye shall not enter into the Kingdom of Heaven
“. Matth.18: 3
Natural knowledge stands opposed
both to simplicity of heart and simplicity of thought.
This knowledge only works within the limits of nature,
but Faith has its own path beyond nature“.

The more a man devotes himself to the ways of natural knowledge,
the more he is seized on by fear
and the less can he free himself from it.
But if he follows Faith, he is immediately freed
and “as a son of God, has the power to make free use of all things“.
The man who loves this Faith acts like God in the use of all created things“,
for to faith is given the Power
to be like God in making a new creation“.
Thus it is written:
You desires, and all things are presented before you” [cf. Job 23: 13].

Faith can often
bring forth all things out of nothing“,
while knowledge can do nothing
without the help of matter“.
Knowledge has no Power over nature,
but Faith has such Power.
Armed with Faith, men have entered into the fire and quenched the flames, being untouched by them.
Others have walked on the waters as on dry land.
All these things are “beyond nature“;
they go against the modes of natural knowledge
and reveal the vanity of such modes.
Faith “moves about above nature“.
The ways of natural knowledge ruled
the world for more than 5,000 years, and man was unable to
lift his gaze from the earth and understand the might of his Creator
until
our faith arose and delivered us from the shadows of the works of this World
and from a fragmented mind.
He who has Faith “will lack nothing
and, when he has nothing,
“he possesses all things by faith,”
as it is written: “All things whatsoever you shall ask in prayer, believing, you shall receive [Matth.21: 22];
and also;
The Lord is near; be anxious for nothing” [Phil.4: 6].

Natural laws do not exist for Faith.
Saint Isaac emphasizes this very strongly:
All things are possible to him that believes [Marc. 9: 23],
for with God nothing is impossible …. “.
To step beyond the limits of nature
and to enter into the realm of the supernatural
is considered to be against nature,
as something irrational and impossible ….
Nevertheless, this natural knowledge, according to Saint Isaac, is not at fault.
It is not to be rejected.
It is just that Faith is higher than it is.
This knowledge is only to be condemned in so far as,
by the different means it uses, it turns against faith.
But when this knowledge
“is joined with Faith, becoming one with her,
clothing itself in her burning thoughts”,
when it “acquires wings of passionlessness” then,
using other means than natural ones,
it rises up from the earth
“into the realm of its Creator”,
into the supernatural.
This knowledge is then fulfilled by faith
and receives the power to “rise to the heights” to perceive him
who is beyond all perception
and to “see the brightness that is incomprehensible
to the mind and knowledge of created beings
.”
Knowledge is the level from which
a man rises up to the heights of Faith.
When he reaches these heights, he has no more need of it – for it is written:
We know in part, but when that which is perfect is come,
then that which is in part shall be done away
” [1Cor.13: 9-10].
Faith reveals to us now the truth of perfection,
as if it were before our eyes.
It is by faith that we learn that which is beyond our grasp
– by faith and not by enquiry and the power of knowledge.
/… /

There are three spiritual modes in which knowledge rises and falls,
and by which it moves and changes.
These are the body, the soul, and the spirit ….
At its lowest level, knowledge “follows the desires of the flesh”,
concerning itself with riches, vainglory, dress, repose of body,
and the search for rational wisdom.
This knowledge invents the arts and sciences
and all that adorns the body in this visible world.
But in all this, such knowledge is contrary to Faith.
It is known as
“Mere knowledge, for it is deprived of all thought of the Divine
and, by its fleshly character, brings to the mind an irrational weakness,
because in it the mind is overcome by the body
and its entire concern is for the things of this world
“.
It is puffed up and filled with pride,
for it refers every good work to itself and not to God.
That which the Apostle said, “knowledge puffs up” [1Cor.8: 1].

Faith presents a new way of thinking,
through which is effected all the work of knowing in the believing man.
This new way of thinking is Humility ….
It is by Humility
that the intellect is healed
and made whole…
The humble man is the fount of
the Mysteries of the new stage of development.

Obviously said of this knowledge,
which is not linked with faith and hope in God,
and not of true knowledge.
True, spiritual knowledge, linked with humility,
brings to perfection the soul of those who have acquired it,
as is seen in Moses, David, Isaiah, Peter, Paul,
and all those who, within the limits of human nature,
were counted worthy of this perfect knowledge.
Saint [Archimandrite] Justin Popovich

Pdf: Prayer of the Three Holy Children

March 16th – Saint Christodoulos Latrinos of Patmos, Saint of the Dodecanese [1020-1111]

Our father among the Saints Christodoulos Latrinos lived at Patmos and is also known as Wonderworker.
He is remembered for the establishment of
the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian at Patmos
and the re-settlement of the island
after the Saracens had de-populated it.

John, the son of peasants Theodore and Anna,
was born in Nicea of Bithynia
in Asia Minor in the 11nth century.
John was a self-taught man who developed a love for books.
As a young man, he followed an ascetic life,
living as a hermit on Mount Olympus of Asia Minor
as well as in the Palestinian desert
before he assumed the monastic habit
and received the name Christodoulos [Gr. “slave of Christ“].
He then served as abbot of the Monastery of Mount Lamos
in Caris in western Asia Minor.
After the incursion of the Saracens in 1085,
abbot Christodoulos and the monks of the monastery fled to the island of Kos
in the southeastern Aegean Sea.

On Kos, Abbot Christodoulos established
a monastery dedicated to the Mother of God.
Also on Kos, Christodoulos met an ascetic, Arsenius Skinouris,
the son and heir of a wealthy landowner of Kos,
who became the abbot’s spiritual son.
Together, they dreamt of re-establishing monastic life
on the nearby island of Patmos that had been de-populated
following attacks by Saracens forces.
During the following several years,
Abbot Christodoulos also established a monastery on the island of Leros, dedicated to Saint John the Theologian.

In 1088, Father Christodoulos presented himself, with Arsenius,
at the court of emperor Alexius I Comnenos in Constantinople
and presented his plan to repopulate the island of Patmos with monastics.       The emperor agreed with his request.
Father Christodoulos was granted sovereignty over the island of Patmos in exchange for the holdings on Kos
that were tied to the inheritance of Arsenius.
In August 1088, Father Christodoulos took possession of
the “deserted and uninhabited island” of Patmos.

When he returned from Constantinople,
he brought masons and other craftsmen
and began the construction, in 1091,
of the monastery dedicated to Saint John the Theologian.
The new monastery
was built over the ruinsof the Basilica of Saint John
of the fourth century and of an earlier temple to the pagan goddess Diana and included a defensive structure that he called the “the Fortress“.
The structure of his monastery remains in use to today.

In 1093, however, raids on the island by Emir Dzaha forced Father Christodoulos and the monks
to flee to the island of Euboia where Father Christodoulos died on March 16, 1093.

Patmos was governed spiritually and administratively by the monastery,
which provided for both the economy of the island and the defense of its inhabitants.
Father Christodoulos had originally envisaged Patmos
as a monastic enclave exclusive of women,
and it was with difficulty that the craftsmen had been able to induce him to set aside a small piece of land
at the far end of the peninsula where
they could build a village and settle their wives
while the monastery was being constructed.

Inside the Katholikon of the Monastery
is a small chapel in the narthex dedicated to Saint Christodoulos.
There his relics are enshrined, having been brought back to Patmos after his death.
Originally placed in a marble sarcophagus,
the relics now rest in a gold and silver plated wooden chest that sits atop the sepulchre for veneration.

Apolytikion       1st Tn
Let us, O brethren, honour godly Christodoulos,
offspring of Nicea, protector of Patmos and boast of monks.
Let us venerate his relics and so receive healing of soul and body,
and cry out with hymns,
Glory to Him Who has strengthened you;
Glory to Him Who has crowned you;
Glory to Him Who through you works healings for all.

Kontakion          4rth Tn
Since we possess your relics
as a holy place of healing for all our diseases and afflictions,
we are redeemed and cry aloud to you,
Rejoice, O Christodoulos.

The Grounds of Saint Christodoulos, the wonderworker
The oral tradition concerning the Grounds of Saint Christodoulos is as follows:
When Saint Christodoulos was living in Patmos,
he planted a garden to supply vegetables for the monks.
The monks who had worked very hard building the Monastery were very tired.
They refused when Saint Christodoulos asked them to dig for water.
Saint Christodoulos then fell to his knees
and prayed all night long for God’s intervention.
His prayer was so warm that at the place where he had dug,
which was in the shape of a cross, a clear, pure spring emerged.
The monks then realized their bad behaviour
and acknowledged the Holiness of Saint Christodoulos.
The garden has been kept up since the 11th century
and is named the “Kipos of the Saint“.
The spring was covered with an arch
and since then it has been called “Holy Water”
or “Water of Saint”
or “Water of the Holy Father”.

Today, only the foundation from the time of Saint Christodoulos remains.
The upper part was reconstructed at a later date.
Besides the Spring of the Saint, other springs have come up near the first one.
These are still in existence from those days.
Near each spring, a reservoir was built to store the extra water.
Once there was a huge boulder on the side of the cliff
overlooking the “Kipi” which rolled down threatening the destruction of the garden.
Saint Christodoulos again prayed warmly and deeply
and this prayer was able to stop the boulder
and made it so secure that it remains in the same place today.
This was truly another miracle.

During the times when people were more pious and believing,
they would go to the boulder and lean on it
for healing purposes on the same spot
where Saint Christodoulos had leaned on it
to stop it from rolling down to the gardens.

There is another story that once a Byzantine Princess lived in Patmos
and that she had hidden a treasure near the boulder.
It has never been found,
or so it was found [by a Dutch sailor ?],
it was never reported.

March 14th – Saint Benedict of Nursia [ca. 480 – ca. 547]

Saint Benedict was not the founder of Christian monasticism,
since he lived two and a half to three centuries
after its beginnings in Egypt, Palestine, and Asia Minor.
He became a monk as a young man
and thereafter learned the tradition by associating with monks
and reading the monastic literature.

He was caught up in the monastic movement
but ended by directing the stream into new and fruitful ways.
This is evident in the Rule which he wrote for monasteries
and which was and is still used in many monasteries and convents
around the world.

Tradition teaches that Saint Benedict lived from 480 to 547,
though we cannot be sure that these dates are historically accurate.
His biographer, Saint Gregory the Great, pope from 590 to 604, does not record the dates of his birth and death,
though he refers to a Rule written by Benedict.
Scholars debate the dating of the Rule though they seem to agree that it was written in the second third of the sixth century.

Saint Gregory wrote about Saint Benedict in his Second Book of Dialogues,  but his account of the life and miracles of Benedict cannot be regarded as a biography in the modern sense of the term.
Gregory’s purpose in writing Benedict’s life was to edify and to inspire,
not to seek out the particulars of his daily life.
Gregory sought to show that Saints of God, particularly St. Benedict,
were still operative in the Christian Church
in spite of all the political and religious chaos present in the realm.
At the same time it would be inaccurate
to claim that Gregory presented no facts about Benedict’s life and works.

According to Gregory’s Dialogues Benedict was born in Nursia, a village high in
the mountains northeast of Rome.
His parents sent him to Rome for classical studies but he found the life of the eternal city too degenerate for his tastes.
Consequently he fled to a place southeast of Rome called Subiaco where he lived as a hermit for three years tended by the monk Romanus.

The hermit, Benedict, was then discovered by a group of monks
who prevailed upon him to become their spiritual leader.
His regime soon became too much for the lukewarm monks
so they plotted to poison him.
Gregory recounts the tale of Benedict’s rescue;
when he blessed the pitcher of poisoned wine,
it broke into many pieces.
Thereafter he left the un-disciplined monks.

Benedict left the wayward monks and established twelve monasteries with twelve monks each in the area south of Rome.
Later, perhaps in 529, he moved to Monte Cassino, about eighty miles southeast of Rome; there he destroyed the pagan temple dedicated to Apollo
and built his premier monastery.
It was there too that he wrote the Rule for the monastery of Monte Cassino though he envisioned that it could be used elsewhere.

The thirty-eight short chapters of
the Second Book of Dialogues
contain accounts of Benedict’s life and miracles. Some chapters recount his ability to read other persons’ minds;
other chapters tell of his miraculous works, e.g., making water flow from rocks,
sending a disciple to walk on the water,
making oil continue to flow from a flask.
The miracle stories echo the events of certain Prophets of Israel
as well as happenings in the life of Jesus.
The message is clear:
Benedict’s Holiness mirrors the Saints and Prophets of old and God has not abandoned his people;
he continues to bless them with Holy Persons.

Benedict is viewed as a monastic leader, not a scholar.
Still he probably read Latin rather well,
an ability that gave him access to the works of Cassianos
and other monastic writings, both rules and sayings.
The Rule is the sole known example of Benedict’s writing,
but it manifests his genius to crystallize
the best of the monastic tradition
and to pass it on to the European West.

Gregory presents Benedict as the model of a Saint
who flees temptation to pursue a life of attention to God.
Through a balanced pattern of living and praying
Benedict reached the point where he glimpsed the Glory of God.
Gregory recounts a vision that Benedict received toward the end of his life:
In the dead of night he suddenly beheld a flood of light
shining down from above more brilliant than the sun,
and with it every trace of darkness cleared away.
According to his own description,
the whole world was gathered up before his eyes
“in what appeared to be a single ray of light” [ch. 34].
Saint Benedict, the monk par excellence,
led a monastic life that reached the vision of God.
Pdf: The Rule of Saint Benedict

He is not indignant, nor provoked,
but with that extreme gentleness He reasons
with him again from the Scriptures, saying,
‘You shall not tempt the Lord Your God‘:
teaching us that we must overcome the devil,
not by miracles, but by forbearance and long-suffering,
and that we should do nothing at all
for display and vainglory
“.
Saint John Chrysostom

• “Listen with the ear of your heart“.
•  “No one is to pursue what is judged best for oneself,
but instead, what is better for someone else“.
•  “Let Peace be your quest and aim“.
Quotes from Saint Benedict’s Rule

March 12th – Saint Paul Aurelian [Pol], bishop of Leon [Bretagne, 6th cnt.]

Saint Paul Aurelian [known in Breton as
Paol Aorelian or Saint Pol de Léon]
was a 6th-century Welshman
who became first bishop of the See of Léon
and one of the seven founder Saints of Brittany.
Paul Aurelian was held to have died in 575 at the age of 140 years,  after having been assisted in his labours by three successive coadjutors,  which suggests several Pauls have been mixed up.

Paul Aurelian was son of Perphir, a lord in Penychen.
He had eight brothers, amongst them Nautel,  Pautel and Bana,
and three sisters, Aude, Sadfyl and Weluela.
He may have lived with the family when they moved to Eastern Dumnonia (Dorset and Devon) for he seems to have
founded Saint Paul’s Church in Caer Uisc (Exeter).
Against his father’s wishes, Paul decided to actually enter the Church. He joined Saint Illtud at Llantwit Fawr and then, on Ynys Byr [Caldy Island],
in the company of Saint Dewi, Saint Samson and Saint Gildas.

Since the lands of Llantwit Abbey were very restricted,
the four lads suggested that Saint Illtud pray for the sea to recede and thus enlarge the monastic holdings.
Illtud prayed all night and bade his disciples do the same.
The next day. at low tide when the sea withdrew by some eight miles, Illtud took his pupils to the water’s edge and drew a line with his staff in the sand.
Ever since, it has never crossed that line and the abbey was able
to reclaim a vast swathe of rich and fertile land.
Paul spent much of his time scaring seagulls to stop them eating the monastic crops.
However, he paid little attention to his duties and the crops were ruined.
Frightened of his punishment, he prayed for Divine intervention.
The next day, he and his three fellows were able  to heard all the seagulls together,
like sheep, and lock them in a barn!

At the age of sixteen, Paul sought the seclusion of the wilderness instead.
He built himself a
little hermitage at Llanddeusant
in Ystrad Tywi
and was ordained a priest there, probably by Saint Dyfrig. Stories of Paul’s Sanctity and good works reached the ears of King Marc of Cerniw [Cornwall].
Marc invited Paul to come to his palace at Caer Banned and more firmly establish the Christian faith in his kingdom.
Paul accepted and spent some years instructing the Cornish.
Marc was keen for him to take up the position of Bishop of Cerniw,
but Paul declined and their relations soured.
Eventually, things came to a head
when Paul asked King Marc
if he might have one of the fine Celtic bells
which he used to call his guests to dinner.
When the monarch refused,
the Saint left his court in a huff.

Paul went to visit his sister, on the Cornish coast,
founding the church at Paul, near Penzance, on the way.
His biographer states that the lady was Sadfyl,
but she was the only sister whose name he knew.
In reality, this seems to have been Saint Weluela,
a reclusive nun who lived at Gulval.
She complained to her brother of the encroachment of the Sea.
So he asked her to mark out the tide line with some pebbles
and then prayed for their miraculous transformation into huge rocks,
forming a natural sea-wall.
Paul then acquired a boat and set sail for Llydaw [Brittany].
However, a story [perhaps of no great antiquity] says
that a storm threw him along the British coast
and he sailed up the River Dart to Staverton, on the edge of Dartmoor.
He decided to build a church there,
but found that his work disappeared each night.
Since the Lord seemed to disapprove of his choice of site,
he moved to the location of the present parish church
and construction proceeded unhindered.
Paul must have tarried on a short while,
for he soon set sail again and landed across the English Channel, on the island of Ushant [Ile d’Ouessant].
At Lampol there, he made himself a new home and was joined by twelve presbyters with their master and deacon.

Eventually, Paul moved on to Telmedou [Ploudalmezeau] in the region of Ach,
in western Domnonée,  establishing
a monastery where his disciple, Vivian,
had tried to build a hermitage until troubled by a roving buffalo.
The local lord was Paul’s cousin, a man named Withur  who had his capital at Ocismor [Saint Pol de Leon].
The two met on Ynys Battham [Isle of Batz]
where Withur sometimes went to spent time alone.
During dinner, Paul told his cousin of his troubles at the court of King Marc
before they tucked into a fine salmon; and, when it was cut,
the bell Marc had refused to give to Paul was miraculously found inside!
Withur gave both the island and his capital city to his cousin.
Paul kept a small retreat on the former,
whilst setting up a monastery at Ocismor [Saint Pol-de-Leon]
to administer to its people.
First, however, he had to overcome a fire-breathing dragon
which had been terrorizing the neighbourhood. Just like Marc,
Withur wanted Paul to become his people’s bishop.
Having heard of his objections, however,
the Lord did not ask him directly but instead sent him to King Childebert I of Paris
with a sealed letter asking the Frankish king to have Paul made a bishop,
whether he agreed or not.
Thus the Saint was at last given an episcopacy,
centred on Ocismor [Saint Pol-de-Leon].

In old age, Paul tried to retire from office, by ordaining his disciples,
Joevin and then Tigernomagle as bishop in his place.
However, both died after about a year
and Paul was forced to resume control himself.
Eventually, he managed to appoint Cetomerin to the bishopric
and, on the day of his consecration, King Judwal of Domnonée visited the cathedral.
Having just re-established himself on the Breton throne,
he granted Paul the site of his victory of the evil King Conomor of Poher.
The saint founded the Abbey of Gerber [Le Relecq] there
under his repentant brother, Tangwy [alias Bana] and retired to the Isle of Batz.
Old and frail, he lived there for some years before dying, it is said at the age of a hundred and four,  on 12th March, previous the end of the 6th century.

Wishful to be a saint, by Saint Silouan, the Athonite

Saints were just people like all of us.
Many of them started with grievous sins
but through repentance they attained to the Kingdom of Heaven.
And everyone who reaches the Kingdom of Heaven does so through repentance,
which the Merciful Lord granted us by His sufferings.

In the Kingdom of Heaven where dwell the Lord
and His most pure Mother, abide all the Saints.
There live our Forefathers and Patriarchs
who valiantly carried their faith before them.
There dwell the Prophets who received the Holy Spirit,
and by their exhortations called the people to God.
There dwell the Apostles who died
that the Gospel might be preached.
There dwell the Martyrs
who gladly gave their lives for love of Christ.
There dwell the holy Prelates
who followed the Lord’s example
and took upon themselves the burden of their spiritual flock.
There dwell the holy Fathers
who lived lives of prayer and fasting,
and those who assumed folly for Christ’s sake,
all of whom fought the good fight
and thereby overcame the world.
There dwell all the Righteous
who kept God’s commandments
and vanquished their passions.

That place aspires my soul
– to that wondrous holy assembly
which the Holy Spirit has gathered together.
But woe is me!
Inasmuch as I lack humility,
the Lord does not grant me the strength to fight,
and my feeble spirit flickers out like a tiny candle,
whereas the spirit of the Saints burned with a bright flame,
which the wind of temptation not only failed to extinguish
but set burning more fiercely than ever.
They trod the earth and worked with their hands
but their spirits continued with God,
of Whom they were ever mindful.
For the love of Christ they endured
every affliction on earth and feared no suffering,
and thus glorified the Lord.
Wherefore the Lord loved them and glorified them,
and granted them the eternal Kingdom with Him.
Saint Silouan, the Athonite‘,
published by Archimandrite Sofronios

2nd Sunday of Lent – Sunday Saint Gregory Palamas – the Son of man has Power on earth to forgive sins

And again he entered into Capernaum after some days;
and it was noised that he was in the house.
And straightway many were gathered together,
insomuch that there was no room to receive them,
no, not so much as about the door:
and he preached the word unto them.

And they come unto him,
bringing one sick of the palsy,
which was borne of four.
And when they could not come nigh
unto Him for the press,
they uncovered the roof where He was:
and when they had broken it up,
they let down the bed wherein
the sick of the palsy lay.

When Jesus saw their faith,
he said unto the sick of the palsy,
Son, your sins be forgiven to you.
But there was certain of the scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts,
Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies?
who can forgive sins but God only?
And immediately when Jesus perceived in his spirit that they so reasoned within themselves,
He said unto them, Why reason ye these things in your hearts?
Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy,
your sins be forgiven to you; or to say,
Arise, and take up your bed, and walk?
But that ye may know that the Son of man
has power on earth to forgive sins,
[he sad to the sick of the palsy],
I say unto you,
Arise, and take up your bed,
and go your way into your house.
And immediately he arose, took up the bed,
and went forth before them all;
insomuch that they were all amazed,
and glorified God, saying,
We never saw it on this fashion
“.
Marc.2: 1-12

The Gospel according to Saint Marc is the shortest
and the earliest of the four Gospels we have received.
The way Marc opens his Gospel is with a simple sentence,
which is, sum total of the entire Gospel;
– “The beginning of the Gospel about Jesus Christ, the Son of God” -.
The acts of apostles and further entire history of the Church
including the contemporary Church experiences
are mere continuation of this glorious beginning
specified by Saint Marc in his opening sentence.
This ensures a direct link between all periods of ages
with the beginning of Gospel.
The word of God is Faithful and True
and is given to us not for merely reading and understanding
but to make it our life experience
and it is worthy of all acceptation
in all fields of action of our life
and the World.

We have just been reading in the Gospel reading about how they brought Jesus
one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four
and He healed him.

one sick of the palsy
It was this man’s misery
that he needed to be so carried
and shows the suffering state of human’s life.
It was kind of those who so carried him
and teaches the compassion
that should be in men
toward their fellow-creatures in distress.
True faith and strong faith
may work in various ways;
but it shall be accepted and approved by Jesus Christ.
Sin is the cause of all our pains and sicknesses.
The way to remove the effect, is to take away the cause.
Pardon of sin strikes at the root of all diseases.
Christ proved His Power to forgive sin,
by showing His Power to cure the man sick of the palsy.
And his curing diseases was a figure of his pardoning sin,
for sin is the disease of the soul;
when it is pardoned, it is healed.
When we see what Christ does in healing souls,
we must own that we never saw the like.
Most men think themselves whole;
they feel no need of a physician,
therefore despise or neglect Christ and His Gospel.
But the convinced, humbled sinner,
who despairs of all help, excepting from the Saviour,
will show his faith
by applying to him without delay.
Marc.2: 13-17

I would like to draw your attention to two ideas in this story.
The first is prayer for others, distant and close.
The second is forgiveness of sins.
These two ideas are tied closely together.
1.]. Because prayer about those close to us intercedes,
as we have seen, for the forgiveness of sin.
2.]. In the plan of our human existence,
forgiveness is also prayer.
Of course, forgiveness from God and human forgiveness are two different things.
Christ speaks and acts as God.
Seeing the Faith of those who brought the paralytic,
He says to the sick man,
Son, be of good cheer; your sins are forgiven you“. Marc.2: 5
– That is, He speaks with Divine authority.
And then, when the Scribes thought to themselves that he was committing blasphemy,
Christ saw this right away since nothing can be hidden
from God all-seeing, not even the depths of the human heart.
He exposed them, saying,
Why do you think evil in your hearts?
For which is easier, to say,
‘Your sins are forgiven you’
or to say,
‘Arise and walk’? “.
Marc 2: 9

Let’s pause here for a moment and think about what The Lord is saying.
“For which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven you,’
or to say, ‘Arise and walk’? ” [Marc.2: 9].
What is this about?
He seems to be saying,
You think I am an ordinary person
and accuse me of blasphemy for speaking words of forgiveness,
but can it really be that hard to forgive sins?“.
Isn’t it much harder to heal a paralytic,
telling him to ‘arise and walk?
After all, forgiveness is available to all
but healing is available to God alone.
Just as ‘the Son of Man has Power on earth to forgive sins’ [Marc.2: 10],
you also have the same power, being likewise sons of men.
When the God-man Jesus Christ speaks of Himself
as The Son of Man, He is speaking of our human nature
which He took upon Himself.
And when He is called the Son of God,
this is witness to his Divine nature:
two natures united in Him without confusion and indivisible.
Therefore, we all have this power to forgive the sins of those close to us.
This is not the same forgiveness
as that offered by God since He forgives and heals,
but it is forgiveness. Speaking as the Son of God,
Christ says to the paralytic,
’Arise, take up your bed, and go to your house.’
And he arose and departed to his house
” [Marc.2: 11].
The people who were there marveled at the miracle
that took place right in front of their eyes
and glorified God.

What is the use of our human forgiveness
if it does not have the power to heal?
Why then should we forgive?

The root of any disease, be it of the soul or
of the body, is sin.
Before there can be healing,
there needs to be deliverance from sin,
that is, before healing can be complete,
there must be forgiveness.
This way,
when we forgive someone close to us,
who sinned against us, we are petitioning God to heal him from sin.
Forgiveness of one close to us becomes our prayer to God for him.
God, seeing in this our faith and love, heals.
Examples of this are plenteous and everyone who has ever forgiven knows about it.
Whoever does not know needs to begin forgiving and find out
– find out how miraculously strife is resolved through forgiveness,
as the soul is healed from offenses, envy and anger,
and most importantly, the soul of the one doing the forgiving is healed.
And then,
the one being forgiven is healed by God Almighty
through the intercession of our forgiveness for him.

Truly, having seen this,
seeing it together with the people
in the Gospel, we Glorify God
Who had given such power to men“.
Marc.2: 12

We see a miniaturized Church in
these five people.
One among them is a needy man.
The other able four put their Trust in God
and co-operate together to give a helping hand to the needy among them
and bringing him to the proximity of Jesus.
They promptly responded to the needy man among them.
They understood that the Grace of God is not restricted to them alone,
but it should be extended to all in Church.
In modern Society [even in Church] we see people are alienated from the society
and live their life aloof [approachable] and not ready to respond to the needs of the co-beings.
In a coöperated society everybody should have – the initiative to educate the uneducated,
– give [medical] help for the needy,
– give shelter for those who do not have a good housing,
– give food for the hungry.
These all are responses needed for the Church in Parish-level,
diocese-level and eventually Church-level.
In this situation only our life and Church can become the Gospel of Christ.

Scripture gives us many examples
for this Transfiguration of the World in history.
When Israel went to the bondage of Egypt,
God has sent Moses. Moses knew his responsibility
to uplift his people as a Mission of God.
To strengthen the helpless in a society is
a commissioned mission of the Church.
Church should be able to hear the cry of people [who are visiting the parish] and stretch the hand of care.
Jesus was not at reach of the man with palsy.
Of his own there was no means for him to approach.
So it was possible for him to come to Jesus only with the help of his friends.
Jesus is Immanuel, which means ‘God with us‘,
not ‘God with me‘.
Jesus was not always in the Temple or Synagogue.
He was always with the mass of the people
who were needy and marginalized.
The mission of the Church is to make the God in the Altar reachable to the mass.
Parish or congregation should not be dearer than Jesus.
The roof should be broken, walls should be demolished
or any hindrance [even foreign languages] should be removed
to make God available to the people.
This type of a Church and society only can Glorify God by heart.
We may need to conquer sometimes the objections of reason,
sometimes those of sense.

When Lord comes down to our midst, He absolves our sin,
He heals our sickness, He gives Wisdom to our mind
and He strengthens our weakness.
Lord opens enormous possibilities and makes our World and Church
a part in the history as a continuation of the Gospel.

2nd Sunday of Lent – Sunday Saint Gregory Palamas – who shall be heir of Salvation?

And, You, Lord, in the beginning
has laid the foundation of the earth;
and the Heavens are the works of Your hands:
They shall perish; but You remain;
and they all shall wax old as does a garment;
And as a vesture shall You fold them up,
and they shall be changed: but You are the same,
and Your years shall not fail.
But to which of the angels
said He at any time,
Sit on My right hand,
until I make your enemies your footstool?
Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them
who shall be heirs of Salvation?
Therefore we ought to give
the more earnest heed
to the things which we have heard,
lest at any time we should let them slip.
For if the word spoken by angels was steadfast
and every transgression and disobedience
received a just recompense of reward;
How shall we escape,
if we neglect so great Salvation;
which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord
and was confirmed unto us
by them that heard Him“.
Hebr.1: 10-2: 3

It would be foolish indeed
to prefer reading a cookbook
to eating a good meal
when one is hungry for God.
Not that there is anything wrong
with reading a cookbook during Lent
– it can be very enlightening –
special when you aren’t an expired cooker,
but it is not very nourishing!
Yet like some of the original readers of Hebrews
we’re doing something very much like that.
We are preferred
to content ourselves with the externals of Faith
– such as the law, the [Aaronic] priesthood and [animal] offerings, [working hard to have a lot of money]
and to ignore the fulfilment of these things
in the Death, Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus.
We want the cookbook rather than the meal!

As we have seen, the Tabernacle in the desert, with its regulations and sacrifices,
was an accurate and Divinely drawn picture
of the Sacrifice of Jesus
and the new arrangement for living
which would be available
to believers in Christ.
But it could only describe these realities up to a point.
It was both a comparison and a contrast.

I carry a picture of my wife in my wallet and,
when I am away from home,
I find it comforting to look at it.
But it is quite inadequate,
for it is not my wife,
only a picture of her.
I can look at it,
but I cannot have a conversation with it.
I cannot laugh together with it,
and I cannot persuade it to cook any meals!
It is an accurate representation of the real thing,
but also a far cry from it.
So the law and the tabernacle
could never do for believers of any age
what the living Christ can do.

“And it had been revealed to him [Simeon]
by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death
before he had seen the Lord’s Christ …
He took Christ up in his arms and blessed God and said:
Lord, [Gr. Despota] now You are letting
Your servant depart in peace,
according to Your word;
For my eyes have seen Your Salvation”.
Luc.2: 26-30

The fact the Simeon would not have seen death
before he saw Christ was a revelation of
the Holy Spirit“.
Therefore the Holy Spirit is “God” and “Master” [Despotis] whom Simeon glorified
because his Prophetic words
were realised.

The Holy Spirit speaks as Giahve (Γιάχβε)
Giahve is the name of the true God in the Old Testament in Hebrew.
I will cite two versus from the Old Testament,
in which the Holy Spirit speaks as Giahve,
as the true God:
Today, if you will hear His voice:
Do not harden your hearts, as in the rebellion,
as in the day of trial in the wilderness,
when your fathers tested Me;
They tried Me though they saw My work.
For forty years I was grieved with that generation,
and said,
‘It is a people who go astray in their hearts,
and they do not know My ways.
So I swore in My wrath,
They shall not enter My rest“.
Psalm 94 [95]: 8-11

This verse is strange and astonishing.
One divine person speaks in the beginning about another Divine person,
and further on speaks about Himself.
On the one hand, the other divine person,
speaks about a third person and uses pronoun “His”,
and on the other hand for Himself
He speaks to the first Person of the Trinity and says
tested Me“, “tried Me“, “My work“, “was grieved“,
said“, “My ways“, “My wrath“, “My rest“.
But Which Person speaks in these versus?
According to the word of the Apostle in Hebrews 3:7,
it is the Holy Spirit speaking.
It is clear from these words that the Holy Spirit is Giahve, that is True God.
With the pronoun “His“, in the beginning of the verse
the Holy Spirit distinguishes Himself from God the Father.
Briefly, the meaning of the verse is:
Today, during the Messianic times,
when you hear His voice, of God the Father,
speaking through the Son, do not do all the bad things that your fore-fathers did to Me,
the Holy Spirit, and as a result I became wrathful and I punished them.

It is worthy to note
that according to this verse
the Hebrews “tested” the Holy Spirit,
according to “They tempted Christ” [1Cor.10: 9]
and according to other versus,
such as Psalm 77 [78]: 41, 56 “Tempted God“.
The Hebrews tempted all Three,
because the Three are one in essence or Divinity.

Then the Spirit entered into me,
and set me upon my feet
and spoke with me
and said unto me,
Go shut yourself within your house.
But you, O son of man, behold, they shall put bands upon you with them,
and you shall not go out among them:
And I will make your tongue cleave to the roof of your mouth,
that you shall be dumb, and shall not be to them a criticizer:
for they are a rebellious house.
But I will speak with you,
I will open your mouth,
and you shall say unto them,
Thus said the Lord …
“.
Ezekiel 3: 24-27

The Holy Spirit speaks by His Prophets
saying that they [the people] will bind him,
that He will make them [the prophets] dumb
and that He will speak to them again
and then open their mouth to preach saying:
Thus said the Lord …“.
The Spirit will speak
and the Prophet communicating the words of the Spirit
will preach:
Thus said the Lord …“.
Therefore the Spirit is the Lord,
the True God.

Christ our God will reveal Himself in the Incarnation for our Salvation and establish His Vineyard, the Church.
This vineyard would consist of those
who are changed through conversion to Him and who are saved from the Assyrian,
who is a wild swine and a solitary beast.
That is the devil.
O God of hosts, convert us now;
look down from Heaven and behold,
and visit Your Vineyard
Which Your right hand planted
and perfect it
“.                                                                                                                                      cf. Psalm 79 [80]: 10-16